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What's wrong with this picture?

There's an old saying that if it sounds to good to be true, it probably is. Our response to the Wayne Master Plan Revision.

 

The effect of low income and high density housing on the crime rate

 

The relationship between low income and high density housing and crime is complicated and fraught with class and race implications and generally has not been addressed in this process. Studies have found that rates of both property and violent crime are generally higher in and around areas with high-density residential developments (Property crime - Adolescent Risk Behaviors by Family Income Level – U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) see below)  (Violent Crime - Thomas D. Stucky, PhD, and John Ottensmann, Director of Urban Policy and Planning School of Public and Environmental Affairs 8 DEC 2009)
Also provided below is a chart made available by the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Office of the Assistant Secretary for Planning and Evaluation which provides some insight into income related conduct in the age group preceding the 25 -34 age group that are the target demographic of the proposed low income and high density developments proposed for construction throughout Wayne.  (Wayne Patch - Wayne Wants to Lure Younger Residents With New Housing Plan by Daniel Hubbard 8/19/13)

TABLE 1.
Adolescent Risk Behaviors and Young Adult Outcomes by Family Income Level

 

Youth from low-income families
(n = 896)

Youth from middle-income families
(n = 594)

Youth from high-income families
(n = 365)

All youth
(n = 2,041)

Adolescent Risk Behaviors

Cumulative risky behaviors (mean)

3.5

3.2*

2.9*

3.3

Alcohol by age 13

15%

13%

15%

15%

Marijuana by age 16

35%

34%

33%

35%

Used other drugs

26%

26%

29%

27%

Sex by age 16

59%

48%*

39%*

51%

Attack someone/get into a fight

33%

26%*

22%*

28%

Member of a gang

12%

7%*

5%*

9%

Sell drugs

19%

19%

20%

19%

Destroy property

35%

38%

36%

36%

Steal something worth less than $50

46%

47%

44%

46%

Steal something worth more than $50

18%

13%*

11%*

15%

Other property crime

16%

15%

10%*

14%

Carry a gun

19%

16%

11%*

16%

Ever run away

21%

16%*

12%*

18%

Other Sexual activity

Sex by age 13

5%

3%*

3%

4%

Birth by age 18 (of female youth)

7%

2%*

1%*

4%

Employment

Employed on 24th birthday

71%

77%

89%*

77%

Connectedness to School or Work between Ages 18 and 24

Consistently-connected

44%

67%*

75%*

60%

Initially-connected

17%

13%*

13%

15%

Later-connected

21%

14%*

9%*

15%

Never-connected

18%

6%*

2%*

10%

Charged with a Crime

Charged with an adult crime by age 24

20%

16%*

12%*

17%

Source: Urban Institute estimates of the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth 1997.
Notes: Some youth who did not complete high school may have earned a General Equivalency Diploma. Median earnings exclude youth who did not work and therefore had zero earnings. The cumulative risk behavior score is based on the 13 risk behaviors listed beneath it. Adolescent risk behaviors are measured up to age 18, except where otherwise noted.  Never-connected youth may make extremely short connections to school or the labor market.
* Estimate is significantly different from youth from low-income families at the 95% confidence level or above.

 

Endnotes
[1] United States Bureau of the Census. 2008 Annual Social and Economic (ASEC) Supplement. Retrieved October 23, 2008 from:  http://pubdb3.census.gov/macro/032008/pov/new02_200_01.htm
[2] Cumulative risky behaviors include consuming alcohol before age 13, using marijuana before age 16, using other drugs before age 18, selling illegal drugs before age 18, engaging in sex before age 16, stealing something worth less than $50 before age 18, stealing something worth more than $50 before age 18, destroying property before age 18; committing other property crime before age 18, being a member of a gang before age 18, getting into a fight before age 18, carrying a gun before age 18, and running away from home before age 18.
[3] Youth who did not obtain a high school degree may have obtained a General Equivalency Diploma.
[4] Results of a trajectory analyses conducted using the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth 1997 identify four pathways for youth connectedness to employment or school between ages 18 and 24: consistently-connected, initially-connected, later-connected, and never-connected. For more information see Kuehn, D., Pergamit, M., and Macomber, J., and Vericker, T. (2009). Multiple Pathways Connecting to School and Work. Washington, D.C.: U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Office of the Assistant Secretary for Planning and Evaluation.

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